Heritage Advice & Guidelines

What is Heritage?

Council’s planning controls protect 10 Heritage Conservation Areas in Bathurst and rural village locations and over 360 individual heritage items within the Bathurst Region. In addition, there is also 36 items of state significance.

Heritage items are individual buildings, structures and places of individual value. The heritage item listing may covers the entire property or landscape and include, gardens, site features, building interiors and exteriors or moveable items of significance. Conservation areas are areas in which the historic origins and relationships between various elements create a cohesive sense of place that is worth keeping. Elements that make the conservation areas significant may include subdivision patterns, consistency of age, style or materials of the building stock, streetscapes and landscaping. For all buildings in conservation areas, the conservation area listing focuses on the exterior of the building or place, gardens, and site structures.

Finding out more information

State Heritage Inventory
The State Heritage Inventory is managed by Heritage NSW. It is a list of heritage items and places in New South Wales including Aboriginal Places, State and Local Heritage Items. Click here to search for information on heritage properties within Bathurst Local Government Area.
https://www.heritage.nsw.gov.au/search-for-heritage/state-heritage-inventory/

Bathurst District Historical Society
The Bathurst District Historical Society can undertake general and archival research for a fee. Please visit their website for more information.
https://www.bathursthistory.org.au/

Trove
Explore the National Library Archives through their website Trove
https://trove.nla.gov.au/

Heritage Strategy

As part of Council’s ongoing commitment to the region’s heritage, Council has adopted the Bathurst Region Heritage Plan 2021-2025 (the Heritage Plan). The Heritage Plan aims to guide heritage management within the Bathurst Region and establishes the key strategic priorities and associated actions for heritage management over the next 4 years. It provides the detail as to how Council and the community will protect, enhance and promote our heritage – buildings and places, the natural environment, people and projects and their embedded stories.

The Bathurst Region Heritage Implementation Plan (the Heritage Implementation Plan) has been prepared to sit alongside the Heritage Plan. It highlights the key activities/programs/projects and services being undertaken by Council’s Planning, Museums, Library, Economic Development and Tourism sections to implement the actions of the Heritage Plan. It also provides an opportunity for interested community, heritage and village groups to provide regular updates on activities they are undertaking with respect to the actions of the Heritage Plan.

Note: The Heritage Implementation Plan should not be viewed as an exhaustive list of all Council and community activities that might relate to heritage management and promotion within the Bathurst Region.

For more information access the the Bathurst Region Heritage Plan 2021-2025 and the Bathurst Region Heritage Implementation Plan.

 

 

What house is that?

Heritage Victoria have a heritage website which contains information on different architectural styles in Victoria, (which are comparative to those in Bathurst), from the early Victorian period through to modern architecture. As house styles have changed over time, sometimes gradually and sometimes dramatically, they reflect the attitudes and ideas of the time and remain as a built reminder of the collective unconscious of each architectural era.

When people choose to live in a house from an earlier architectural period, they usually want to preserve the original features and character. This website can assist in achieving that objective. It describes the main details of houses still present in Melbourne, (and elsewhere in the country), including their cultural background, key exterior and interior features and colour schemes. This information will assist owners when renovating, such as avoiding the installation of horizontal windows in a Queen Anne house, or terracotta tiles on a Victorian house.

Other sections of that website cover sustainability, renovating and an "interactive neighbourhood".

 

 

Colour Schemes

Choosing a colour scheme for a dwelling should be based on research including the style of the house and the original colour scheme. Chapter 12 of Bathurst Regional Development Control Plan 2014 has recommended colours based on building period.

Details of the original colour scheme can be sourced from historical documents and photographs about the particular dwelling, and also from an investigation of the existing paint layers on various surfaces. Removing successive layers of paint can reveal historical and original colour schemes.

Heritage NSW also provides an informative technical guideline regarding paint finishes(PDF, 214KB)

Finding out the original paint colours of your building - a general guide

Step 1: Where to start

Investigate and scrape different areas of a wall or architectural feature because of possible colour variation, as on mouldings and decorative elements Look in hard to-get-to areas such as under window sills, top or bottom edge of doors and close to joints where the original coating may still be preserved to avoid missing a paint layer. Mark on a plan where you decide to check paint colours - consider concentrating on those areas of the building with greatest heritage significance as these areas may be most relevant area to reinstate the original colours. Avoid inhaling lead paint as it was commonly used before the 1950s.

Step 2: Examine a small area of paintwork on site

Use a sharp knife or blade to cut diagonally across the paint coatings to expose different layers of paint until the original layer is reached. Scrape back with a razor blade or sanding block larger individual layers of paint to help match colours. Apply oil or glycerine to the paint scrape to help bring out the colour for comparisons with paint charts.

Step 3: Record and interpret findings

Record the location and colour of each paint scrape, starting with the base and ending with the current layer. Understanding how a colour fades can help you to identify its changes through sunlight exposure - for example, Brunswick green fades to a light-blue and red paint fades more quickly than most colours.

Match the colours found with a traditional paint chart.

Further information 

Please contact Council to determine if undertaking the above maintenance works will require formal development consent. In most instances these works can be considered exempt development. Painting in the B3 Zone will require consent, however Council will waive the fee. For more information contact Council to arrange an appointment with Council’s Heritage Advisor.

 

 

Salt Attack and Rising Damp

Heritage Council NSW - Salt attack and rising damp: A guide to salt damp in historic and older buildings(PDF, 3MB).  The guide aims to provide owners, consultants and contractors with sufficient information to understand what causes salt attack and rising damp (and also falling and penetrating damp) and to diagnose and identify appropriate repairs for cases commonly seen in Australia. While emphasis is given to buildings of heritage value, the principles apply to all older buildings.

Rising damp, a worldwide phenomenon, is a major cause of decay to masonry materials such as stone, brick and mortar. Even when mild it can cause unsightly crumbling of exterior masonry and staining of internal finishes. It may also cause musty smells in poorly ventilated rooms. NSW Heritage Office Maintenance Series – Information Sheet 2.1 Rising Damp provides a brief introduction to rising damp, its control and treatment, for the owner or manager of buildings of heritage value. A short bibliography of more detailed works on the subject is included for interested readers.

A copy of the guide can be downloaded here...

 

Statement of Heritage Impact

When you are proposing to change an old place you may need to prepare a statement of heritage impact. The statement explains how your changes to that place will maintain what makes the place special. The statement will also present your case to Council to approve changes to an old place.

A statement of heritage impact may be required for changes proposed to:

  1. a heritage item listed on the local environmental plan (LEP);
  2. places located within a heritage conservation area;
  3. places nearby to a heritage item or older buildings in a heritage conservation area;
  4. unlisted properties that are over 50 years of age and considered to be of heritage significance; or
  5. demolish a building which contributes to the heritage significance of the Bathurst Region.

Where Council is of the opinion that the proposal may impact on the significance of that building or site or its streetscape or setting the statement will be required to assess the extent to which the carrying out of the proposal would affect the heritage significance of the property concerned.

Council has prepared a template guide(PDF, 222KB)  to assist in the preparation of statements of heritage impact.

The NSW Heritage Division's Statement of Heritage Impact guidelines can be downloaded here.

 

Photographic Recordings

Photography is an important documentary tool in cultural heritage management. It is often a requirement that heritage places - including archaeological sites, buildings and structures, gardens and objects - be photographically recorded prior to alteration or destruction. The guidelines below provide guidance for those commissioning or undertaking photographic recording of heritage places and objects.

The Photographic Recording Guidelines can be downloaded here...(PDF, 814KB)

The NSW Heritage Division's Photographic Recording of Heritage Items using film or digital capture can be downloaded here...(PDF, 173KB)

 

 

 

Maintenance Guidelines and Reference Books

The Heritage Division, Office of Environment and Heritage, and Heritage Victoria websites contain technical notes on a number of different aspects relating to traditional building materials.

Topics covered include building materials, typical maintenance requirements and possible solutions for maintenance, including rising damp and salt attack. Notes are also available regarding heritage buildings and energy efficiency and sustainability, as well as heritage gardens and grounds.

What house is that?

Heritage Victoria have a heritage website which contains information on different architectural styles in Victoria, (which are comparative to those in Bathurst), from the early Victorian period through to modern architecture. As house styles have changed over time, sometimes gradually and sometimes dramatically, they reflect the attitudes and ideas of the time and remain as a built reminder of the collective unconscious of each architectural era.

When people choose to live in a house from an earlier architectural period, they usually want to preserve the original features and character. This website can assist in achieving that objective. It describes the main details of houses still present in Melbourne, (and elsewhere in the country), including their cultural background, key exterior and interior features and colour schemes. This information will assist owners when renovating, such as avoiding the installation of horizontal windows in a Queen Anne house, or terracotta tiles on a Victorian house.

Other sections of the Heritage Victoria website cover sustainability, renovating and an "interactive neighbourhood".

Bathurst Library

In addition to the above online references, there are a range of books relating to maintenance and restoration of old houses. The list of books below are available for loan from the Bathurst Library.

  • How to Restore the Old Aussie House
  • Colour Schemes for Old Australian Houses
  • Getting the Details Right: Restoring Australian Houses 1890s-1920s
  • The Federation House: A Restoration Guide
  • Australian House Styles
  • Caring for Old Houses
  • The Complete Australian Old House Catalogue : where to get absolutely everything to restore an old building

The above books are available for purchase at bookshops and restoration shops throughout Australia.

 

 

 

 

Interpretation Strategies

Heritage Interpretation may be required:

  • To attract visitors.
  • For educational and recreational purposes.
  • When the use changes or when works are undertaken. This usually occurs as part of the development application process.
  • For landscapes, so people can appreciate the significance of the place.

The aim of interpretation is to tell the stories about what makes a place significant. A Heritage Interpretation Plan aims to guide the development of what stories to tell and in what format will reach the most audience.

The following resources can assist in developing your Heritage Interpretation Strategy.

Heritage Interpretation Plan Template(PDF, 472KB)
Interpretation Planning Flow Chart(PDF, 342KB)
National Trust Sharing our Stories(PDF, 1MB)
NSW Heritage Office Interpreting Heritage Places and Items Guidelines(PDF, 118KB)

 

 

Heritage Trades, Services & Supplies Directory

Older buildings benefit from routine maintenance and have unique characteristics. While a lot of home maintenance can be undertaken by property owners, some types of work require specific materials and the expertise of tradespeople experienced in conservation work.

The trades and services named in this Directory have been suggested to Bathurst Regional Council as providers of heritage related services, however Council makes no endorsement of the products or services supplied by the companies or persons listed.

Download Council's Heritage Trades, Services & Supplies Directory.(PDF, 1021KB)

 

Heritage Survival Kit

The Heritage Survival Kit(PDF, 998KB)  has been developed by Bathurst Regional Council to assist private residential property owners maintain Bathurst's unique heritage. The kit contains three main parts:

Part 1: provides a list of contacts and advice to help you research the past history of your house.

Part 2: contains a list of tips for caring for old buildings.

Part 3: outlines architectural and financial assistance which may be available to help you maintain your house.

Heritage Victoria have a heritage website which contains information on different architectural styles in Victoria, (which are comparative to those in Bathurst), from the early Victorian period through to modern architecture. As house styles have changed over time, sometimes gradually and sometimes dramatically, they reflect the attitudes and ideas of the time and remain as a built reminder of the collective unconscious of each architectural era.

When people choose to live in a house from an earlier architectural period, they usually want to preserve the original features and character. The Heritage Council Victoria website can assist in achieving that objective. It describes the main details of houses still present in Melbourne, (and elsewhere in the country), including their cultural background, key exterior and interior features and colour schemes. This information will assist owners when renovating, such as avoiding the installation of horizontal windows in a Queen Anne house, or terracotta tiles on a Victorian house.

 

 

Fascia Signs

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What is a Fascia Sign?

A Fascia sign means an advertising structure attached to the fascia or return of an awning. Fascia signs must not extend beyond the depth of the existing fascia on the awning of the building.

When is development consent required?

A development application is not required if the fascia sign:

is erected within the B3 Commercial Core zone, and
does not extend beyond the depth of the original fascia on the awning of the building.

In this regard Council’s preferred option is that the fascia sign be painted directly onto the existing awning fascia.

A development application is required for all other new signage in the B3 Commercial Core zone. Council will waive the development application fees.

What should you do?

Next time you intend to replace, repair or alter your fascia signage check to see if your existing signage structure extends beyond the depth of the original fascia. If this is the case remove the structure and either:

  1. paint your new sign onto the original awning fascia, or
  2. obtain a new backing board structure that does not extend beyond the depth of the original fascia.

Where you cannot comply with these requirements you will need to lodge a development application for your new sign with Council. Contact Council’s Environmental, Planning & Building Services Department on 6333 6240.

Signage placement & style

Consideration should be given to painting the sign directly on the building. Sign writers are then mindful of the space available, its shape and proportion.

Good signs and signwriting enhances the building by contributing to the interest of the façade and ensures that signs do not detract from the building features.

Good signs and signwriting will use a lettering style that reflects both the age of the building and the user.

The wording contained in a sign should ‘fit’ the space and form part of the overall colour scheme.

Signs that hide the original fabric detract from the building’s quality.

A building’s façade and good signage will contribute positively to the streetscape.

For further information on size location requirements, please see Chapter 12 of Bathurst Regional Development Control Plan 2014.

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Construction Heritage Management Plan

When undertaking development in areas of high or moderate archaeological potential such as those areas indicated on Map 35 of Bathurst Regional Development Control Plan, Council may request a Construction Heritage Management Plan to be submitted.